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Fishing improves in March beginning with the likely return of Northern puffers. These small to medium-sized fish puff up with air when they’re caught and reeled in. Prized for their meat by some anglers, they are often called blowfish or blow toads. The Northern puffer is not deadly poisonou…

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Ken Partlow of Currituck shows off a nice puppy drum he caught at Jennette’s Pier in February. A former fishing instructor, he has enjoyed a great run of keeper drum over the winter. Fortunately, this year the puppy drum stuck around Outer Banks waters throughout the change of seasons, and t…

  • By Fran Marler, contributing writer
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As a surfer you meet heaps of people. With some people you stay connected in the water, and with some the experience is more fleeting. And then there are those who stick with you no matter where you go. Mickey McCarthy was one of those people. At the mere mention of his name, a smile broaden…

  • By Fran Marler, Contributing writer
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What do you do when the chill in the air becomes daunting, the urge to shiver is instantaneous and the sky is a heavy gray blanket? Some head straight to the couch and hibernation. Others kick off the covers and seek some adventure.

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Cape Hatteras National Seashore stretches 70 miles from Nags to Ocracoke Island, protecting a huge portion of the Outer Banks from development and preserving habitat for native wildlife. A great variety of outdoor recreation is available here, including swimming, beach combing, hunting, fish…

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Pea Island NWR was established in 1938 to preserve and protect habitat for a variety of wildlife, including sea turtles and nesting, resting and wintering migratory birds. The bird list for the refuge boasts more than 365 species, and the wildlife list has 25 species of mammals, 24 species o…

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This eastern North Carolina wildlife refuge protects and preserves habitat for a variety of wildlife, including red wolves, American alligators, black bears, red-cockaded woodpeckers and a variety of migratory birds. Fishing, hunting, paddling, wildlife observation, photography, environmenta…

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  • By Fran Marler Contributing writer
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How one Hatteraswoman has made drum fishing a family tradition

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How Surfline impacts the world of surfing with hyper-local forecasting.

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To fish alone or hire a guide, that is the question.

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A fisherwoman’s desire to help cancer patients lives on in the Alice Kelly Memorial Ladies Only Billfish Tournament.

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Diversify your workout by taking it to the water with SUP yoga

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Father/son fishing duo Jim and Jimmie Horning prove that the apple doesn’t fall far from the tree.

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At ESA contests, surfers from Maine to Florida hit the water with their talents.

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Lifeguard camps for kids in Kill Devil Hills and Corolla are a growing success.

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The love of windsurfing is alive and well.

  • By Fran Marler Contributing writer
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Ashley Linnekin and the art of shaping Crashley Surfboards

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The centuries-old tradition of guiding duck hunts is alive and well on the Outer Banks.

  • By Brian Horsley Contributing writer
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Coastal North Carolina hosts a good number of non-breeding and sub-adult whales each winter. Humpbacks and the occasional fin whale stop and feed along our shores during their migration south. These huge mammals are feeding on the abundant schools of bay anchovies and menhaden. These whales …

  • By Jeff Hampton Staff writer, The Virginian-Pilot
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3-D imaging and printing are a helpful resource for documenting shipwrecks

  • By Michelle Wagner Contributing writer
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Could northeastern North Carolina’s natural resources be the key for boosting the region’s economy?

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A family of seasoned mountain campers discovers seaside camping on Portsmouth Island.

  • By Brian Horsley Contributing writer
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Anglers use natural bait for much of the surf fishing and pier fishing in the fall. The kind and condition of the bait can make a big difference. Always use fresh bait when you can get it.

  • By Michelle Wagner Contributing writer
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Marc Corbett is dedicated to discovering and documenting Outer Banks shipwrecks, and he’s sharing his findings at the Graveyard of the Atlantic Museum this week.

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Curtis Cromwell creates the Outer Banks’ only locally shaped skimboards.

  • By Brian Horsley Contributing writer
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The 7-foot, medium-action spinning rod is a really inexpensive and versatile outfit. A spinning reel that will hold about 200 yards of 8 to 12 pound line, either braid or monofilament, will match up perfectly with this size rod. You can use this rod on the end of the pier fishing jerk jigger…

  • By Brian Horsley Contributing writer
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Don’t know what type of charter is best for you and your family? What follows is a basic definition of the types of Outer Banks fishing charters.

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Paddling the tea-colored creeks and canals of Alligator River National Wildlife Refuge feels a world away from the beach.

  • By Brian Horsley Contributing writer
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Anglers fishing outside Oregon Inlet have been catching a nontraditional gamefish called ribbonfish. These fish are voracious eaters and will take most cut bait fished just under the surface. There is no question how they got their name.  They are long and flat, the body tapers down to a poi…

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A surfer for five decades, Tony Gray doesn’t let age get in the way of riding waves.

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Children gain more than sailing skills in the Outer Banks Community Youth Sailing Program.

  • By Brian Horsley Contributing writer
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A great way to spend some time fishing is on a fishing pier.  It can be as easy or a complicated as you want it to be. Let’s look at the basics and the gear needed to have a fun outing on the pier.

  • By Brian Horsley Contributing writer
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The kind of bait and the condition of the bait can make a big difference in your summer catch. Always use fresh bait when you can get it.

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For 45 years, the free Fritz Boyden Memorial Youth Tournament has helped kids experience the thrill of fishing.

  • By Brian Horsley Contributing writer
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The red drum, also known as drum, channel bass, redfish or simply reds, is a game fish that is found in the Atlantic Ocean from Massachusetts to Florida and in the Gulf of Mexico from Florida to Northern Mexico.

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World-famous diver Jim Bunch of Kill Devil Hills will speak at Underwater Symposium

  • By Brian Horsley Contributing writer
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The red drum, also known as drum, channel bass, redfish or simply reds, is a game fish that is found in the Atlantic Ocean from Massachusetts to Florida and in the Gulf of Mexico from Florida to northern Mexico.

  • By Brian Horsley Contributing writer
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Whether you bought a expensive fishing outfit or a economical combo it is nice to get more than a few sessions out of each. Saltwater is the enemy: It loves to eat away metal and leaves you with a powdery deposit where some of your reel and rod parts were. If you are a surf fisherman, sand a…

  • By Brian Horsley Contributing writer
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In October the waters cool down and the air temps can be a little chilly, but this means that speckled trout and drum will be in the surf. Most anglers who wade in the surf and sound don waders when the water temperatures drop. Waders are simply rubber boots with waterproof bibs attached, an…

  • By Brian Horsley Contributing writer
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Whether you bought an expensive fishing outfit or an economical combo, it is nice to get more than a few sessions out of your tackle. Saltwater is the enemy: It loves to eat away at metal and leave a powdery deposit on your reel and rod parts. Surf anglers can add sand to the salt – a tough …

  • By Brian Horsley Contributing writer
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The red drum, also known as drum, channel bass, redfish or simply “reds,” is a game fish that is found in the Atlantic Ocean from Massachusetts to Florida and in the Gulf of Mexico from Florida to Northern Mexico.

  • By Brian Horsley Contributing writer
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During the warm months on the end of any Outer Banks pier, you can find anglers fishing live bait. You have to have a lot of patience to be a successful pin-rig fisherman.