The Graveyard of the Atlantic Museum in Hatteras is named in honor of the thousands of shipwrecks that have sunk in the waters off North Carolina’s coast, and is dedicated to the preservation and presentation of the state’s maritime history and culture with an emphasis on shipwrecks.

Standing tall over Cape Hatteras, this 198.5-foot lighthouse is open for climbing between late April and mid-October. The climb is 257 steps, equivalent to a 12-story building. Climbers must be at least 42 inches tall. The Museum of the Sea in the keepers quarters is open year round.

Cape Hatteras National Seashore stretches 70 miles from Nags to Ocracoke Island, protecting a huge portion of the Outer Banks from development and preserving habitat for native wildlife. A great variety of outdoor recreation is available here, including swimming, beach combing, hunting, fish…

Chicamacomico is the most complete of all the remaining U.S. Life Saving Service stations in North Carolina and one of the most complete in the nation. Visitors can explore two stations and five outbuildings and learn about the valiant men who risked their lives to rescue shipwrecked sailors…

This museum is a nonprofit educational foundation created for the purpose of preserving Native American artifacts, art, and culture. Exhibit galleries, nature trails and a gift shop offer an immersion experience into Native American culture. Visitors will see a nationally recognized collecti…

This museum is named in honor of the Outer Banks’ nickname, Graveyard of the Atlantic, which refers to the thousands of shipwrecks that have occurred on this coast for centuries. Exhibits are dedicated to the preservation and presentation of the state’s coastal and shipwreck history, with em…

Pea Island NWR was established in 1938 to preserve and protect habitat for a variety of wildlife, including sea turtles and nesting, resting and wintering migratory birds. The bird list for the refuge boasts more than 365 species, and the wildlife list has 25 species of mammals, 24 species o…