We're always interested in hearing about news in our community. Let us know what's going on!

Upon leaving the beaches of the Outer Banks, most of us will do one of two things — head directly over the Wright Memorial Bridge towards Virginia, or do the bridge hop onto highway 64 towards Raleigh.

As the spring approaches, we anticipate the return of bottlenose dolphins to Roanoke Sound. The Outer Banks Center for Dolphin Research has monitored the bottlenose dolphin population in the Outer Banks since 2008 using photo-identification. By photographing the distinctive markings on the d…

There are two places in the world where the Labrador Current and the Gulf Stream collide — the Grand Banks just off the coast of Newfoundland, and the Outer Banks of North Carolina. The result is nothing short of fantastic.

Bottlenose dolphins are a common sight at Outer Banks beaches. On any calm day throughout the summer, dolphins can be seen traveling along the oceanfront, feeding, or playing in the waves. Dolphin watching is also a growing industry in the Roanoke Sound, with at least six eco-tour boats read…

Overall, the fishing from the past week has been slow to down right dismal. Things are slowly getting back to normal after the monsoon of late-July. The Outer Banks had around 20 inches of rain in less than two weeks. Between the wind and the rain, it has knocked our fishing for a loop. Thin…

Always with a friendly smile, yet strong and patient, with nerves of steel and unshakable dedication. They provide military service, waterway security, assist with maritime transportation, hazardous materials shipping and are even on the scene as pollution response. Did we mention that as we…

Late July is the beginning of the dog days of summer. Just because it is hot, the fishing does not stop. Dolphin and billfish should be available to all offshore fisherman. There are a few blues and Spanish for boats fishing along the beaches. Pier and surf fisherman are at the mercy of the …

Well, July is here, and for the most part, the fishing forecast will remain fairly constant. It is not the summer doldrums but steady mid-summer fishing. Find some time and enjoy it.

Dropping beneath the surface the all too familiar serenity settles in like a warm blanket on a cold winter’s night. There are no sounds aside from the rhythm of your breath, a marine mammal echo-locating somewhere off in the distance and perhaps the occasional whir of a boat engine passing above.

The scene is enthralling and serene all in the same instance. Calmly you slip beneath the surface and an entirely new world lies before you. What was once a tragic scenario, now presents itself as a masterpiece for a variety of species to make their home. Shellfish happily accommodate each a…