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No student of Blackbeard can explore the nearly 300-year-old legend of one of history's most notorious brigands long before realizing that it's riddled by exaggeration and invention.

The Graveyard of the Atlantic Museum in Hatteras is named in honor of the thousands of shipwrecks that have sunk in the waters off North Carolina’s coast, and is dedicated to the preservation and presentation of the state’s maritime history and culture with an emphasis on shipwrecks.

Although the Outer Banks is now well known as a vacation destination, that wasn’t always the case. For a long time these islands were considered just an isolated stretch of sand on the easternmost edge of North Carolina. That began to change once the Wright Memorial Bridge was constructed in…

Rodanthe’s Old Christmas in January is a unique Outer Banks holiday tradition that has lasted for at least 100 years.

Nearly everyone who has even the slightest bit of history on the Outer Banks has heard about the Nags Head Casino. But few know about the blue collar beginnings of the building that housed the coastal dance hall.

Blackbeard is perhaps the most well known pirate in history. Made famous by early accounts of his exploits in the Caribbean and along the shores of colonial North America during the 18th century Golden Age of Piracy — not to mention the legions of books and films his life continues to inspir…

In the early 1970s developers threatened the future of Jockey’s Ridge — until one woman came up with a plan.

Virginia Dare’s 350th birthday celebration on August 18, 1937, was a historic milestone that not only captured President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s attention but also set the stage for the country’s most long-lasting outdoor drama.   

For nearly three decades a showboat that’s still best known as the James Adams Floating Theatre traveled throughout our region’s waterways bring entertainment to the masses.

By the end of the Civil War, a small Nags Head chapel called All Saints was dismantled to build housing for the freedmen’s colony on Roanoke Island. A half-century later it was reborn as St. Andrew’s by-the-Sea.

Erosion is hardly a new issue on the Outer Banks – in fact, sand-fixation efforts date back to the 1930s when a few of President Roosevelt’s New Deal programs provided the manpower needed to create a protective line of oceanfront sand dunes from Corolla to Ocracoke.